Talks

Talks and Lectures

If you’d like to ask Ben to come and run a lecture/workshop then click on the contact page to e-mail him. You might want to check the Booking Info page first too.
He is always on the look out for new things to talk about, but he currently regularly delivers the following talks/workshops:
(click on the pictures for more detail)

The Creation of Number

Where do numbers come from?

Philosophy vs Maths

Mathematical Murder

Puzzling Proofs

Mysterious Memes

The Magical Mandelbrot Set

The Sacred Geometry of Chance

“He deals the cards to find the answer,
The sacred geometry of chance,
A hidden law of a probable outcome,
The numbers lead a dance.”
[Sting – Shape of My Heart]

Pretty Irrational

Numbers. The Greeks had them all sorted – lovely rational numbers that made sense. Some measure of bloody-mindedness meant they refused to see the truth of ‘non-rational’ numbers (poor Hippasus). We investigate the journey into irrationality, including trying to count them all.Is there such a thing as the “Most Irrational Number”? Yes. You can see it too. And it’s pretty… pretty irrational.

Magical Maths

Works well with primary or secondary school students – a workshop demonstrating and experimenting with ways of producing shock, surprise and magic (with a little help from maths!). Number tricks, proof (if we can dive into some algebra) and card tricks.

Truth and Beauty

“My work has always tried to unite the true with the beautiful, and when I had to choose one or the other, I usually chose the beautiful.”
Hermann Weyl – German Mathematician and Theoretical Physicist

Cryptic Maths in School

A brief introduction to basic Cryptography and the mathematics behind it.

Maths, Music, Beauty and Harmony

Is there a correlation between mathematical and musical skill?

Why are there 12 chromatic notes in an octave?

Why do some harmonies sound ‘beautiful’ and others not? Is it an arbitrary opinion, or something more fundamental?

How on earth have One Direction got so popular?

Rumours of Other Worlds

How mathematics acts as a consciousness-raiser, and lets us imagine and work with ideas beyond what we can see or touch. Uses the famous novel Flatland (Edwin Abbot – 1884) and explores extra dimensions, 4D cubes, complex numbers, and the central theme of humility (or lack thereof…) in the development of science and mathematics. Pretty pictures and mind-expanding ideas abound.

Moving Maths

An exploration of the emotional side of mathematics, including how the use of dynamic (moving) software can fundamentally change the way we think about mathematics. Suitable for teachers.